General Practice Data for Planning & Research Directions including how to opt out

The data held in the GP medical records of patients is used every day to support health and care planning and research in England, helping to find better treatments and improve patient outcomes for everyone. NHS Digital has developed a new way to collect this data, called the General Practice Data for Planning and Research data collection.

The new data collection reduces burden on GP practices, allowing doctors and other staff to focus on patient care. Please click on the link below to find more information and how to opt-out of your data being extracted.

General Practice Data for Planning and Research (GPDPR) – NHS Digital

Opting out

If you don’t want your identifiable patient data to be shared for purposes except for your own care, you can opt-out by registering a Type 1 Opt-out or a National Data Opt-out, or both. These opt-outs are different and they are explained in more detail below. Your individual care will not be affected if you opt-out using either option.

Type 1 Opt-out (opting out of NHS Digital collecting your data)

We will not collect data from GP practices about patients who have registered a Type 1 Opt-out with their practice. More information about Type 1 Opt-outs is in our GP Data for Planning and Research Transparency Notice, including a form that you can complete and send to your GP practice.

This collection will start on 1 July 2021 so if you do not want your data to be shared with NHS Digital please register your Type 1 Opt-out with your GP practice by 23 June 2021.

If you register a Type 1 Opt-out after this collection has started, no more of your data will be shared with us. We will however still hold the patient data which was shared with us before you registered the Type 1 Opt-out.

If you do not want NHS Digital to share your identifiable patient data with anyone else for purposes beyond your own care, then you can also register a National Data Opt-out.

Statement for Patients

We are sorry for the inconvenience being caused for our patents trying to contact the practice by telephone recently. You may have found that trying to reach us first thing on a Monday morning has been particularly difficult.

Like many GP practices in Lancashire, our telephone system is run by a local NHS IT provider who are aware of these issues.

We want to assure you these problems have been escalated and explain that fixing them is not in our control, so please be patient with us whilst they are being addressed.

We have been told that over the next few weeks, a short term fix being put in place that should ensure our telephone systems can stay online during very busy periods. In the longer term, we know that upgrades are being made to the system that should fully resolve the problems.

Remember, there are other ways that you can contact the practice. Firstly if you are able please review our web pages please do this is where we will provide you with the most up to date methods of contacting us or where appropriate other alternatives exist such as:-

* MyGp or PatientAccess ; an app that you may have already downloaded (if not please do and follow the instructions for use) which you can use to book appointments, contact the practice or order your prescriptions.

* As usual, you should dial 999 in an emergency and can access NHS111 or your local pharmacy for advice.

Coronavirus – Advice for Patients

The symptoms of coronavirus are:

The symptoms are similar to other illnesses that are much more common, such as cold and flu and it does not necessarily mean you have the illness.

NHS 111 has an online coronavirus service that can tell you if you need medical help and advise you what to do.

Use this service if:

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

Information for the public is available at gov.uk/coronavirus and https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19

Like the common cold, coronavirus infection usually occurs through close contact with a person with novel coronavirus via cough and sneezes or hand contact. A person can also be infected by touching contaminated surfaces if they do not wash their hands.
The risk of being in close contact with a person with coronavirus or contaminated surfaces is very low at the current time.
Everyone is being reminded to follow Public Health England advice to:

You can find the latest information and advice from Public Health England at www.gov.uk/coronavirus.

Updated:
02.03.2020